Micropropagation, genetic fidelity assessment and phytochemical studies of Clerodendrum thomsoniae Balf. f. with special reference to its anti-stress properties

  • Pallab Kar Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of North Bengal, Siliguri- 734013, India
  • Arnab Kumar Chakraborty Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of North Bengal, Siliguri- 734013, India
  • Malay Bhattacharya Molecular Biology and Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Tea Science, University of North Bengal, Siliguri- 734013, India
  • Tanmayee Mishra Molecular Biology and Tissue Culture Laboratory, Department of Tea Science, University of North Bengal, Siliguri- 734013, India
  • Arnab Sen Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Department of Botany, University of North Bengal, Siliguri- 734013, India

Abstract

Clerodendrum thomsoniae commonly known as bleeding heart vine or bag flower which is a good candidate for a new crop for the floriculture industry. In this study, in-vitro callus regeneration of C. thomsoniae through nodal culture has been attempted. Murashige and Skoog’s medium supplemented with 2 mg/l BAP and 0.5 mg/l

Keywords: Clerodendrum thomsoniae,RAPD, ISSR, Nodal stem segment, Genetic fidelity, GC-MS

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Kar, P., A. Chakraborty, M. Bhattacharya, T. Mishra, and A. Sen. “Micropropagation, Genetic Fidelity Assessment and Phytochemical Studies of Clerodendrum Thomsoniae Balf. F. With Special Reference to Its Anti-Stress Properties”. Research in Plant Biology, Vol. 9, no. 1, Mar. 2019, pp. 09-15, doi:https://doi.org/10.25081/ripb.2019.v9.3779.
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